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Old 06-21-2009, 12:48 PM   #1
Stamina1914
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Default Do rare rums appreciate in Value.....

I was just curious. Let say for example the Appleton 250th or the Appleton 30 year old rum where only 1400 bottles will be made, or even the Mt. Gay Tri. If someone where to get their hands on these rums and not open (collectible) what do you think their value will be 5, 10, 15..... years from now.

I know like everything else, the formula is easy supply v. demand. But as rum and aged rum are becoming more and more of the in thing, what the do you think the demand for limited edition rums will be moving forward?
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Old 06-21-2009, 03:40 PM   #2
Arctic Wolf
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Here is my beliefs on the collectability of Rum versus other spirits. First lets take Scotch/cognac/tequila. By Law Scotch must be made and aged in Scotland for at least three years. A similar restriction exist for tequila and cognac which limits the producible area to a certain geographic area. Because these spirits have a worldwide appeal but are limited in their production by law a kind of a false market is obtained which increases the prices for these spirits. It is quite easy to find $100 bottles of all of these spirits right out of the cask.

Rum on the other hand can be produced pretty much anywhere, in such a huge variety of ways that competition forces initial prices very low. I have read and chuckled over many posts where the postee complains that $35 is too high a price to pay for a premium bottle of rum. The postee is not wrong, its just that I cannot even find a middling bottle of tequila/scotch or congac at that price.

A stumbling block for the value for a particular rum bottling to go up is also the perception amongst the millions of rum drinkers in North America that rum should be inexpensive. This perception is changing but not very fast.

So in relative terms Rum is not nearly as collectible as those other spirits. But you can take heart. Well known rum producers can develop outstanding credibility in the market place. Appleton is pretty much world famous with a consistent taste profile. (Bicardi would be a rum producer which is known throughout the world as well but lacks the consistency of flavour (IMO) from country to country.)

A rare Appleton has the potential to go up based upon its worldwide appeal and the fact that everyone everywhere knows what the Appleton is likely to taste like. (Now a rare say Zaya may not have as much market potential. The distillery is not well known worldwide. There will be far fewer people nostalgic for the product.)

I do collect Rums, Scotch and Canadian Whiskey. But when I buy a bottle, the aftermarket price is never a consideration. My only criteria is how much enjoyment I personally get from owning a particular bottle. And how much I like the taste of the product. I almost always sample a bottle before I buy it. (This is not as difficult as it sounds.) If my bottle never goes up, I never worry because drinking it slowly over time is often reward enough.


Now the above are strictly generalizations and must not be applied to any particular bottle from any particular distiller.
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Old 06-21-2009, 07:08 PM   #3
Seminole
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I am curious about this as well. Mount Gay only made 3000 bottles of the Tricentennial and will never make this again, luckily I have one. As the bottles that are out there are consumed and they are more rare, does a bottle that was bought for $350 today go up in value in 10 years for someone who really wants a bottle of Tricentennial in the future. I say that it definitely will to a rum collector who wants to get his hands on a bottle of Tricentennial. Look at that bottle of W & M that went for $53,000 or the bottle of Martha Washington that went fr $20,000. Very rare or limited edition rums will always go up in value as supply depletes, you just have to find someone willing to buy it. There are plenty of Spirit collectors who will pay high dollar for bottles like these.

Another question, will rum or spirits go bad in an unopened bottle over time? I know there have been discussions on proper storage of opened bottles, but haven't seen one on unopened bottles.
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Old 06-21-2009, 07:52 PM   #4
Arctic Wolf
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Here is my take on unopened bottles of any distilled spirit.

First off we have the cork versus screw cap. I prefer the cork but cork will deteriorate over time if not stored properly. I tip my bottles for one day 3 times a year to keep the cork wet and the bottle sealed. Some collectors will even dip the sealed bottle in wax to prevent air from getting at the cork. I do not like screw tops because I have had many bottles leak threw the screw top (Most recently my Cuban Legendario 7yr) which means alcohol must be evaporating out.

Much more important than the cork or screw top is the affect of light. Direct sunlight will cause chemical reaction in the sealed bottle. The affect is very small and unnoticeable in the short term, but over a lengthy time (10 years or more) the affect will be noticeable. Light and temperature together can have an increased affect. I prefer storage in my basement where temperature never gets above 65 degrees. I keep all of my bottles in sleeves to keep the light out. So in all a cool dark place is best.

As for any particular bottle increasing over time a factor like winning significant awards is important. But it is important to be able to trace the bottle to the actual bottling that corresponds to the awarded bottle. For example the recent award of Whiskey of the year in Jim Murray's Whiskey Bible to a particular bottling of Uigeadail exported to British Columbia caused a huge increase in price for that bottling, but only a mild increase to the rest of the stocks. This means the stamps on the labels telling consumers exactly which batch they are buying is very important. Better still is information which can trace the bottle to a particular number within a particular group of casks or even a single cask.

I suspect as we travel through time things like the reputation of the collector himself (or herself) will be important. I never but anything from a private collection unless I am satisfied that the bottle was purchased legally, stored properly, and never tampered with.
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Old 06-21-2009, 08:18 PM   #5
Hank Koestner
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I guess I will never know how much a spirit can appreciate, because it takes to long for them to become valuable enough, and as a rule, If I buy a bottle, it will be consumed. That delicious honey in the bottle does no good sitting on the shelf. Plus, I have to dust the damn things.
Over at Corona Cigar, there are a couple of pre embargo Cuban Rums that vary in price from 3000 to 10000. I was there the other night, looking at them thinking if I was a rich man and could afford the pleasure, I might buy one, just to see what the rum tasted like. Except for one bottle, they all looked intact.
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:03 AM   #6
Bluehammer
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Any sense in collecting Renegade rum? I noticed on one store's website that they are considered limited run (1000 or so bottles of each).
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Old 06-22-2009, 01:52 AM   #7
Lew Barrett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Koestner View Post
I guess I will never know how much a spirit can appreciate, because it takes to long for them to become valuable enough, and as a rule, If I buy a bottle, it will be consumed. That delicious honey in the bottle does no good sitting on the shelf. Plus, I have to dust the damn things.
Over at Corona Cigar, there are a couple of pre embargo Cuban Rums that vary in price from 3000 to 10000. I was there the other night, looking at them thinking if I was a rich man and could afford the pleasure, I might buy one, just to see what the rum tasted like. Except for one bottle, they all looked intact.
He's not just saying this for effect! I can vouch for Hank's willingness to drink the good stuff first, and share it with his friends!
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Old 06-23-2009, 12:22 PM   #8
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A little voice in my head tells me renegade rum isn't worth collecting...but I don't know why. I agree on the important issues with arctic wolf. Only differences are I tend to like screw caps but obviously will still buy cork tops, and instead of laying the bottles on their side for a day 3x a year I lay them on their side once a week while I water the plants for a couple of minutes. The more I think of it however I like the wolfs idea for cork hydration. As for bottles and worth...I think its worth it if its a big name company. If its rare or a pain in the rear to get I'd sell it now. Point in case, cuban rum. If you got it, sell it now, because once trade starts going through that bottle won't be worth much.
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Old 04-18-2017, 04:23 PM   #9
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Fully Agree with Arctic Wolf and would add , there are those very special rums that are made almost to perfection and suddenly become hard to find and some disappear or then mass produced but not matching the original quality , now days i almost always taste then research , finding when i really like a particular rum, that has it all for the most part, that so do many others just like me. I then validate through several rum rating sites reviews and forums i.e. The Ministry of Rum , Rum Howler , etc ) . Then i decide how much i want to purchase and properly store , specially to personally enjoy for years ahead ( I learned this with 3 bottles i stashed around 11 years ago of Zacapa Centenario 1876 XO 1976 ) but also to pass on to any potential future family/friends aficionados like me when it may be very hard or almost impossible ( very cost prohibitive ) to find.I personally believe new generations will become much more interested in the unique flavor of Rum and these saved "gems " will even be much more appreciated. ...so if you like it , can afford it and spotted some, buy 4-5 bottles to put away !.....salud !
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Old 04-20-2017, 08:16 AM   #10
gdsmit1
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I'm pretty new to rum and have no experience at all with buying spirits as an investment. But I would think it would work just like everything else.

It seems like more and more people are becoming interested in rum. This will drive up the price of the bottles on the shelf. As people drink more rum, there will be a sub-set that want to experience things they can no longer buy at their local liquor store.

As someone else mentioned, as the bottles of limited edition rum are consumed, the supply diminishes and the new rum aficionados will drive up the prices of the bottles in the supply chain.

As for Cuban rum, it could be a toss up what that bottle of Cuban rum will go for once the embargo is lifted. If it's something that is readily available to someone in Cuba, it will likely be worth less. But if it's something special like a limited release, it could go through the roof as rum drinkers discover they like what's coming out of Cuba and want to get their hands on the rare stuff.
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