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Old 08-03-2014, 12:57 AM   #1
mamajuana
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Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Buffalo
Posts: 206
Default Hilarious Cuba libre historical commentary

I found this info when researching my main mixed drink and figured I would share it. This is credited to Esquire.com


Commentary from Esquires resident cocktail historian on the Cuba Libre :

"In the simplified form of Rum and Coca-Cola, this was one of the chief fuels that kept the home fires burning back during the Big One. It helped that there was practically nothing else to drink. By 1944, all American distillers of any size had for a couple of years been forking 100 percent of their production over to Uncle Sam, and domestic stocks were low, low, low. Caribbean rum was about the only import plentiful enough to make up for that (things got so bad they were even making gin out of sugarcane, not to mention vodka). The mixer situation wasn't much better. Sugar was rationed, which cut into the market-share of the daiquiri and Collins and such, and ginger ale was scarce. Not Coca-Cola, though. It's good to be the king.

All the Andrews Sisters bobbysoxer jive aside (don't make us repeat it), the Cuba Libre was already enjoying a comfortable middle age. This wasn't its first war, or even its second. The drink was invented, it turns out, by a doughboy (or whatever they were calling 'em) in Cuba, during the aftermath of the Spanish-American War. That was in 1900. "Cuba Libre!" was the rallying cry of the Cuban independence movement, a cause that was quite popular on this side of the Florida Straits. Sorta the "Free Tibet" of its day, only back then we felt obligated to back up our feel-good sloganeering with battleships and infantry divisions.

Of course, having gotten out from under Spain, it took Cuba another 60-odd years to get libre from the Yanquis. At which point, miffed, we slapped on an embargo that rendered it illegal to consume an authentic Cuba Libre in either of the countries that produce its two essential components. But in absolute point of fact, nobody has been able to drink a Cuba Libre in its full, original glory since about 1901, when the suits at Coca-Cola started getting nervous about their product's crank factor and began exploring ways to phase out its not-inconsiderable cocaine content. Hobbyists/drink archaeologists take note: We really can't endorse any attempts to create a historically correct Cuba Libre. Wish we could, but there you have it. But even without that key alkaloid, the drink is a potent little speedball that's way tastier than it has any right to be. Don't leave out the lime, though. "

And remember when making a proper Libre to: "muddle the squeezed-out lime shell in the bottom of the glass before adding the rest of the ingredients, in order to extract a little of the rind's bitter oil. " Known as the Baker's Procedure or Kappeler's Procedure.
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